e-Inclusion : Nouveaux enjeux, nouvelles politiques

Ouvrage dédié à la fracture numérique

Présentation

Présentation

20 septembre 2005 : La Fing annonce la parution, sur le site de la Commission européenne, du rapport "e-Inclusion : nouveaux défis, nouvelles politiques" ("e-Inclusion : New Challenges and Policy Recommendations"), coordonné par Daniel Kaplan (Fing) et préfacé par la Commissaire européenne à la Société de l’Information et aux Médias, Viviane Reding.

Pour le Groupe d’experts eEurope dont émane le rapport, "en se concentrant uniquement sur des objectifs quantitatifs de pénétration des TIC, l’Europe a raté une occasion d’utiliser ces technologies au bénéfice de l’inclusion sociale."

Se fondant sur l’expérience des acteurs de terrain ainsi que sur les résultats de nombreux travaux de recherche européens, le Groupe propose ainsi 7 nouvelles orientations pour associer le développement des TIC et l’inclusion sociale.

Communiqué - Rapport européen sur l’e-Inclusion

22 septembre 2005 La Fing annonce la parution, sur le site de la Commission européenne, du rapport "e-Inclusion : nouveaux défis, nouvelles politiques" ("e-Inclusion : New Challenges and Policy Recommendations"), coordonné par Daniel Kaplan et préfacé par la Commissaire européenne à la Société de l’Information et aux Médias, Viviane Reding.

Pour le Groupe d’experts eEurope dont émane le rapport, les politiques actuelles de lutte contre la fracture numérique sont inefficaces, parce que mal ciblées : "En se concentrant uniquement sur des objectifs quantitatifs de pénétration des TIC, nous avons raté une occasion d’utiliser ces technologies au bénéfice de l’inclusion sociale."

L’exploitation des recherches européennes menées dans ce domaine permet cependant d’identifier quelques pistes nouvelles. Dans la première, les TIC ne sont rien d’autre quesont avant tout des outils à mettre au service des politiques sociales en général. Il s’agit alors d’équiper les travailleurs sociaux sur le terrain d’outils qui permettent de personnaliser leurs services et de devenir plus mobiles, ou encore, de développer des formes de médiation de proximité (maisons de service public, "écrivains publics internet"…).

La seconde piste consiste à s’intéresser aux initiatives locales et aux microprojets qui et aux communautés qui aident les publics en difficulté à se saisir des outils technologiques pour se prendre en charge.

Si l’inclusion se mesure à la participation plutôt qu’à la consommation, c’est à ces niveaux-là qu’il faut chercher de nouvelles inspirations.

Le rapport a été présenté publiquement pour la première fois lors de l’Atelier européen sur l’inclusion et la participation sociales dans la société de l’information, qui s’est tenu le 23 septembre 2005 à Bruxelles.

Il peut être téléchargé sur le site de la Commission européenne : [http://europa.eu.int/information_so…]

Préface de Viviane Reding, Commissaire européenne à la Société de l’Information et aux Médias

e-Inclusion is about using Information and communication technologies (ICT) to empower all Europeans. This means more than just increasing access and making services widely available and easier to use, although these steps are important. It means also assisting people to use ICT to make their lives richer and more fun and by helping them to participate more fully in their lives as members of their families, neighbourhoods, regions, countries and as Europeans.

e-Inclusion is not something that will happen all by itself. Studies show that although ICT use is becoming more and more widespread, the gap between the information haves and have-nots in Europe is not getting narrower. This is because ICT use is a moving target. Each generation of new technology brings advances that risk leaving out those who do not have enough money, skills or motivation. These new divisions create costs in terms of social engagement and economic efficiency. For instance, ICT will lead to much better and more efficient public services, but only once nearly all citizens want them and are able to take them up.

For these reasons - participation, equality and efficiency - I have placed e-inclusion at the centre of my work as European Commissioner for Information Society and Media. It is one of three pillars of my new i2010 strategic framework for the Information Society in Europe. The Commission has already adopted a Communication on eAccessibility and it will shortly bring forward proposals on broadband access in remote and rural regions.

In June 2006, a ministerial conference on ICT for inclusion will debate practical measures for advancing e-inclusion, based on the results of a Member State working party that is currently being set up. In parallel, we will continue our efforts to develop e-government, e-learning and e-health, in particular in response the ageing of European society.

All of these efforts are aimed at 2008, when I will launch a European Initiative on e-Inclusion to give the issue the visibility it needs and to make sure we implement practical solutions.

The current report contributes to this emerging e-inclusion agenda. It is a far ranging and provocative report from a group of independent experts. Already during its preparation, some of its ideas were taken into account in policy development. And it will undoubtedly continue to be valuable in feeding the debate that will carry us forward towards the 2008 European initiative.

That is why this report is welcome. I hope it will open new debates and help us to bring all our creative energies to bear on what could be one of the enormous advantages that we have in Europe - a commitment to a society that is efficient, fair and inclusive.

"e-Inclusion : New Challenges and Policy Recommendations" : Executive summary

eEurope Advisory Group Synthesis of the report prepared for the eEurope Advisory Group (september 2005). Coordinated by Daniel Kaplan, FING. Foreword by Viviane Reding, European Commissioner, Information Society and Media.

In January 2004, the European Commission asked the newly constituted second section of the eEurope Advisory Group, composed of independent experts, to create two working groups : one on the geographical digital divide, looking at broadband territorial coverage [1], and one on e-Inclusion (hereafter the Working Group’), which prepared this report.

e-Inclusion is a fashionable topic on which literature and policy initiatives abound. The purpose of our Working Group was not to provide an exhaustive review of that material, but rather to draw upon this knowledge, and the experience of experts within the eEurope Advisory Group, to assess the current situation and current policies in order to suggest new directions to policymakers.

The Working Group quickly became convinced that the focus on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) access characterised by most of current policy action on the information society fails to capture the real challenge : e-Inclusion is essentially about social inclusion in a knowledge society. Access to ICT tools, networks and services, and even digital literacy, are merely preconditions for e-Inclusion. Beyond that, the real issue is whether ICT makes a difference to an individual’s ability to take an active part in the different spheres of society, i.e. work, social relationships, culture, political participation, etc. The issue is one of empowerment rather than access. Empowerment is not an automatic consequence of access. In some cases, the development of online services and communications can produce or deepen isolation and exclusion ; in others, communities are empowered by ICT even when each individual does not make personal use of ICT tools and services.

e-Inclusion and social inclusion are highly correlated. This helps explain the apparently paradoxical results of surveys measuring relative differences in ICT penetration and usage between socio-economic groups, which point out that despite the dramatic growth of ICT penetration in all groups of society, the digital divide remains as large today as it was in the late 1990s. e-Inclusion is a moving target : On the one hand, several underprivileged communities tend to develop creative ways of using ICTs, either individually or collectively ; on the other hand, technological innovation constantly creates new gaps, and growing use generates new professional and social requirements that are difficult to meet by large parts of the population.

By focusing almost exclusively on quantitative targets of ICT penetration, an opportunity has thus been missed for these technologies to contribute to a more inclusive society.

For e-Inclusion is essential for rising to the challenges of Europe. A more e-Inclusive society allows for a more competitive economy where citizens are better equipped to find better jobs, where companies can find the qualified workers they need to compete in an information economy. In a more e-Inclusive society, a greater number of citizens are empowered by new tools to work, learn, create and express themselves in new ways, thereby making society as a whole more dynamic and cohesive. In a more e-Inclusive society, the pursuit of productivity in the private and public sectors is more easily compatible with sustainable development, with high levels of employment and with easy access to public services for all.

The fact that in the early days of the information society, public policy as well as corporate strategies focused more on raising awareness, demand and use by the average individual is perfectly understandable. Even today, strong and innovative industries, as well as a competitive telecom and technology landscape, remain necessary preconditions for any ambitious e-Inclusion policy. Indeed, some European countries are still working to create this competitive landscape and should continue to do so. However, in most of Europe, the information society has now reached a level of development that warrants new ambitions and new directions for policy action on e-Inclusion.

The Working Group believes that by 2010, ICT should have provided a measurable contribution to equalising and promoting of participation in society at all levels, as well as to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of all social policies. The largest possible number of individuals and communities should be able to benefit from ICT tools and services, either directly or indirectly, and to fully participate in a knowledge-based society and economy, regardless of their revenues, culture, place of residence, disability, age or gender.

The set of recommendations in this report aims at that objective, suggesting significant modifications to current policy actions affecting e-Inclusion :

Considering the current level of maturity of Europe’s information society, e-Inclusion should become a higher policy priority. This implies, in particular, that policy actions on ICT should be evaluated not only according to their economic impact, but also to their social impact. e-Inclusion is not a mechanical result of the growth of the information society. Depending on today’s decisions, our information society can either become more inclusive or more polarised. We believe that it is possible to reconcile economic, social and environmental goals. Such is the vision that we have been trying to convey in this report.


[1] See this group’s report at : [http://europa.eu.int/information_so…]

Cible mouvante : La fracture numérique ne se résorbera pas avec les remèdes actuels, par Daniel Kaplan

29 septembre 2005 Article paru dans le N°0 de la Technology Review française

En apparence, la fracture numérique, c’est simple : d’un côté, ceux qui accèdent aux technologies et aux réseaux et disposent des compétences pour les utiliser ; de l’autre, ceux qui manquent des moyens ou des connaissances nécessaires. Les indications thérapeutiques en découlent : baisser les prix ou subventionner l’accès, développer l’accès public, sensibiliser, former - ou encore, éliminer le besoin de formation en facilitant, au travers d’interfaces et d’appareils nouveaux, l’accès aux services essentiels.

Plusieurs recherches [1] européennes nous obligent pourtant à reconsidérer entièrement la "fracture numérique", ou pour reprendre l’expression désormais consacrée, l’"e-inclusion".

Premier paradoxe : malgré l’augmentation du taux d’accès de la population aux technologies de l’information et de la communication (TIC), l’écart relatif entre groupes sociaux n’a pas décru en Europe depuis 2000, et très peu depuis 1997. C’est ce que révèle l’"indice de facture numérique" produit par le projet européen SIBIS. Cet indice rassemble trois mesures l’accès à un PC, l’accès à l’internet et l’équipement internet à domicile, et permet d’évaluer l’écart entre les groupes les plus et les moins équipés en fonction de quatre critères (cf. graphique).

L’"indice de fracture numérique dans l’Europe des 15, 1997-2000

Indice de fracture numérique

indice de fracture numérique

(Un indice égal à 100 signifie une absence de fracture ; plus sa valeur est faible, plus l’écart entre groupes sociaux est grand. Source : SIBIS.)

Second paradoxe : quand on s’intéresse aux usages, les lignes de fractures se brouillent. De quel côté de la fracture se trouve l’agriculteur africain qui ne sait pas lire mais qui, pourtant, utilise le mobile du village pour s’informer des cours de ses productions sur les différents marchés ? Et le cadre retraité qui choisit délibérément de ne pas installer de PC dans sa résidence du Périgord ? Et ce migrant qui, depuis un cybercafé, visio-communique avec sa famille et ses amis grâce à un logiciel de messagerie instantanée ? Et cette secrétaire rompue à l’usage des outils bureautiques et du courriel, mais incapable de s’adapter aux nouvelles demandes qu’on lui adresse, qu’il s’agisse de fouiller dans les moteurs de recherche ou de participer à un groupe de travail en ligne ? Comme le montre un récent rapport du groupe européen Esdis [2], développer l’accès et la formation aux TIC est une condition nécessaire, mais nullement suffisante. La question qui compte est celle des capacités dont disposent les individus pour exprimer leur potentiel, vivre leur vie, participer à la vie sociale - ce que les anglophones expriment par le mot empowerment.

Mais l’e-inclusion est une cible mouvante, parce que l’innovation technique recrée sans cesse de nouveaux écarts : les hauts débits sont toujours plus hauts dans les centres-villes, les nouveaux outils toujours plus puissants, mais toujours aussi coûteux, complexes et mal pensés pour les utilisateurs affligés de handicaps.

Pour le Groupe d’experts eEurope, les politiques actuelles de lutte contre la fracture numérique sont inefficaces, parce que mal ciblées : "En se concentrant uniquement sur des objectifs quantitatifs de pénétration des TIC, nous avons raté une occasion d’utiliser ces technologies au bénéfice de l’inclusion sociale." Certaines politiques en faveur des TIC peuvent même s’avérer néfastes : si, par exemple, le développement de l’administration électronique aboutit à réduire la possibilité, pour les publics en difficulté, de trouver une assistance humaine pour résoudre leurs problèmes administratifs, il aura pour effet d’accroître l’exclusion sociale.

Les recherches européennes permettent cependant d’identifier quelques pistes nouvelles. Dans la première, les TIC sont avant tout des outils à mettre au service des politiques sociales en général. Il s’agit alors d’équiper les travailleurs sociaux sur le terrain d’outils qui permettent de personnaliser leurs services et de devenir plus mobiles, ou encore, de développer des formes de médiation de proximité (maisons de service public, "écrivains publics internet"…) grâce auxquelles on peut bénéficier des avantages des services en ligne sans nécessairement devoir les utiliser soi-même.

La seconde piste consiste à s’intéresser aux initiatives locales et aux microprojets et aux communautés qui aident les publics en difficulté à se saisir des outils technologiques pour se prendre en charge. On pense à des formes de micro-financement de projets locaux, à l’évolution des points d’accès public à l’internet en centres de soutien à toutes sortes de projets associatifs, professionnels ou artistiques utilisant les TIC, ou encore, à un appui à la constitution et l’animation de communautés en ligne.

Si l’inclusion se mesure à la participation plutôt qu’à la consommation, c’est à ces niveaux-là qu’il faut chercher de nouvelles inspirations.


[1] SIBIS (Statistical Indicators Benchmarking the Information Society, [http://www.empirica.biz/sibis/]) et Einclusion@EU ([http://www.einclusion-eu.org])

[2] "eInclusion revisited : The Local Dimension of the Information Society", février 2005 (disponible sur le site europa.eu.int)

Liens de référence sur l’e-inclusion

Site de la Commission

Principaux projets de recherche européens

Articles de recherche

Vous & la Fing

Participez à nos travaux

Les échanges et productions se déroulent sur le réseau collaboratif de la Fing.

Proposez un projet

Vous avez un projet innovant qui fait le lien entre transition numérique et transition écologique à valoriser ou nous présenter.

Suivez-nous